Little Writings. Some Rants.

Christian Mihai on Writing

letter

Just a little bit earlier yesterday, Christian Mihai, author and blogger extraordinaire, posted in his blog, sharing a little bit of his world with us.

I was going to reblog it because it really resonated with me, but I figured I’d go a little further and just kinda discuss the beauty of To Whom it May Concern.

If you don’t know about Christian Mihai, he’s a twenty-six year old who has tailored six short-stories and two novels (one of which is sitting on my kindle waiting to be read. I’ll get there, I promise!!) He’s a shameless advertisement plugger, youtuber, and has this voice in his daily blogs: he has that way of writing that penetrates your soul. His biography says he was born in Romania and can’t draw a straight line (me neither, Chris, me neither…)

I’ve met a few authors here on WordPress. I’ve read beautiful prose that brings tears to my eyes, giggled with cat memes, bounced up and down in excitement at shared titles in writing playlists, and discussed how to handle those characters that sneak up on you.

I’ll talk about those later. And surely, all of these encounters have struck me in a certain way. No ifs or buts, I feel blessed to have met and shared some of your world with you in these small interactions.

So here’s my and statement:

Christian Mihai, I get you. I never thought of it that way before.

To Whom it May Concern (link above, if you haven’t read it yet.) is an 870 word exploration into Mihai’s philosophy on life and writing that really struck me. Now, I’ve read his other blog posts, such as the one about Atlas , that also struck a chord with me. (Who can’t respect a quote from Ayn Rand?)

Anywho, if you haven’t read his stuff, please do. He’s a gem.

This was my favorite part.

Every once in a while someone asks me for writing advice. “How do I write a good story? What makes good writing good?”

There is only one answer.

Find the thing you’re afraid of the most, rummage through your brain until it hurts, and write about it.

Because in all those years that’s what I did. I wrote about what I had and lost, about what I never had, and about all that I was certain I’d never have.

And I wrote until all my wounds healed. Now I’m working on inflicting myself new ones.

As much as art is a constructive process, in which we play God, at the same time is also a destructive process, in which we break pieces of our soul and throw them on paper.

I kinda relate to this a lot.

If you ask my mother, I was writing before I knew letters, and would present to her these squiggle tales in such detail, read aloud in my mickey mouse voice.

I’d always wanted to write.

It really wasn’t until I lost large and very important things in my life that my writing began to be filled with substance. Before shit hit the fan, my writing was empty.

So while my methods certainly may not be the same, I can’t help but empathize with Chris.
I’d like to add to the suggestion that writing is a constructive process, because while writing breaks down our psyche for the readers in sometimes unknowingly (to them) intimate ways, and builds worlds and allows us to “play God,” as he wrote, writing can also act as the construction of scar tissue.
Food for thought.
If you agree or disagree, let me know in the comments. And visit Christian Mihai’s blog, read his books. The link to his page was hyperlinked above. If you’d like to discuss his quote, comment on the original post, also linked above.

Thank you all for your support 🙂
-Poppy
***battle buddies will not resume this week. University is kicking my you-know-what. I’ll return next week with some more lovely merrikh.****

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3 responses

  1. Great post, friend. Great post. Too many compliments though.

    February 20, 2017 at 3:51 pm

    • spritzyclover

      Haha, I was positive you would be offended by the “shameless advertising” and the shameless suggestions of opinion. However, am positive-ly beaming that you enjoyed it.

      Not too many compliments. Don’t get me wrong, I am an optimist. But I also don’t write about things that don’t grab me. And that deserves some compliment at the very least.

      In return, thank you for the compliments, the read, and the comment! Have a beautiful day 🙂

      February 20, 2017 at 3:58 pm

  2. Wow, fantastic article!
    I never really thought about it that way either, but Chris got it exactly right.
    We value what we lose or cannot have and that’s what makes us yearn for it even more.
    I think this especially holds true when it comes to fiction because we want that which cannot happen to us or something that possibly could but we fear won’t happen to us.

    February 27, 2017 at 5:50 am

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